All American Road Trip {Part 4: Boston}

Boston is just a short drive from Salem, and since parking in town is difficult to find on weekdays - and expensive once you find it - we parked at Logan Airport and took the free shuttle into the city. Once we got into Boston I could see right away why the city is known for its greenspace. The parks are beautiful and public space in the city is really well designed, which is reflected in how well it is used... every park and plaza we passed was packed. We made our way to Samuel Adams Park outside Faneuil Hall Marketplace where Arts on the Arcade was taking place. After listening to some live music, we wandered over to Quincy Market and browsed the stalls, then headed over to see the replica Cheers restaurant. Navigating through the crowds, we boarded a boat at Long Warf for a harbor cruise that provided great views of the city's skyline, as well close views of two important American ships: the Nantucket Lightship (LV-112) and the USS Constitution.

Built in 1936, the Nantucket was the last serving American lightship, and the only American lightship to be stationed in international waters.The Nantucket was named a National Historic Landmark in 1989. Slightly more impressive was the USS Constitution, or Old Ironsides, which was laid down in 1794 and launched in 1797. Made famous in the War of 1812, during which her crew sank five British warships (and earned her nickname), the USS Constitution is world's oldest naval vessel still in active service (she's taken out at least once a year and has a complete, active duty crew).

After our harbor cruise we made the most of a hop-on/hop-off trolley to tour the streets of Boston, seeing Old North Church, from whose steeple were hung the lanterns that warned Paul Revere of the approaching Redcoats, as well as the Old State House, from whose balcony the Declaration of Independence was first publicly read in Massachusetts on July 18, 1776.

Sticking to our quest for Americana, we saw Fenway Park which, having been built in 1912, is the oldest ballpark in America. On a side note, the second oldest in Wrigley Field, which we saw in Chicago. And like Chicago, Boston had a somber stop: the very touching Marathon Memorial at Arlington Street Church where visitors tie ribbons with messages of hope, love, and remembrance to the wrought iron fence.

As I mentioned earlier, I loved the parks in Boston. The Boston Common, established in 1634, is actually the oldest public park in America! Right next to the Common is Boston Public Garden, established in 1837. I adored the iconic and picturesque swan boats that have been providing tours of the Garden's lagoon since 1877, as well as the famous, and adorable, Make Way For Ducklings statue. Boston Common and Boston Public Garden are actually part of a chain of linked parks called the Emerald Necklace, the masterplan for which was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, America's first landscape architect, in 1877. I could have spent days exploring the city's parks!

Two other important locations we visited were the Boston Public Library and Harvard in Cambridge, but those will have to wait for the next installment!

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This was installment 4 of my All American Road Trip. The next installment will be {Part 5: Boston Public Library}

Source: http://www.lilyandlane.ca/wp-content/uploa...